Saturday, June 16, 2018

NHS Membership, Not School Year predicts Prestige in College Admission at McCort


Two years ago I followed up my post on McCort graduating class year and National Honor Society (NHS) membership with the types ofcolleges that they were admitted to.  This year I found a greater percentage of the 2017 graduating class with NHS membership.  I thought I would take a look how it looks for college admission for the class of '17.

I looked at the other two catholic high schools in the Altoona Johnstown Diocese, Bishop Guilfoyle and Bishop Carroll in their NHS membership.  Bishop Guilfoyle did not publish it's graduating class on its website but it does say "75% achieve GPA exceeding the academic criteria set by the National Honor Society."  The criteria there is 94%.  Bishop Carroll did post it's graduating class and 8 out of 57 graduates were NHS members or 14% which is close to McCort's class of 1987 %.  I couldn't find their criteria for NHS membership.

I looked at McCort's class of '17 graduate profile and compared it to the class of '16 and my class of '88 as to which types of colleges they were admitted to.  I used the same classification I used 2 years ago with US News and World Report's rating system described below.  The results of the table can be seen below.

I categorized schools according to the US News score.  An elite school had a score of 61-100 (U. of Penn, Johns-Hopkins) a second tier school had a score of 35-60 (Pitt, Penn State), a third tier four year school had a score of 34 or below or were unranked (Indiana (PA) or IUP as we in PA call it, Pitt-Johnstown or UPJ).  Community colleges, jr colleges, or advanced technical schools were 4th tier.  Those who went into the military or were employed were placed in the 5th tier and those who were undecided or deferred for a year were placed in tier 6.  This classification is totally mine and you are welcome to disagree with it.  The listing of all schools, their 2016 US News score (if available), the classification, the school considered, and the number of students going to that school from each class are presented at the bottom of this post.


College rank * NHS * Year Crosstabulation
Year
NHS (%)
Total
n
y
1988
College
Rank
1
6(46.2%)
7(53.8%)
13
2
30(61.2%)
19(38.8%)
49
3
54(91.5%)
5(8.5%)
59
4
9(81.8%)
2(18.2%)
11
5
11(91.7%)
1(8.3%)
12
6
4(100.0%)
0
4
Total
114(77.0%)
34(23.0%)
148
2016
College
Rank
1
2(40.0%)
3(60.0%)
5
2
26(53.1%)
23(46.9%)
49
3
24(82.8%)
5(17.2%)
29
4
6(100.0%)
0
6
5
1(100.0%)
0
1
6
7(100.0%)
0
7
Total
66(68.0%)
31(32.0%)
97
2017
College
rank
1
1(14.3%)
6(85.7%)
7
2
20(43.5%)
26(56.5%)
46
3
12(60.0%)
8(40.0%)
20
4
6(100.0%)
0
6
5
5(100.0%)
0
5
6
3(100.0%)
0
3
Total
47(54.0%)
40(46.0%)
87
Total
College rank
1
9(36.0%)
16(64.0%)
25
2
76(52.8%)
68(47.2%)
144
3
90(83.3%)
18(16.7%)
108
4
21(91.3%)
2(8.7%)
23
5
17(94.4%)
1(5.6%)
18
6
14(100.0%)
0
14
Total
227 (68.4%)
105(31.6%)
332


A statistical analysis of these numbers shows that a higher percentage of NHS members were admitted to top and second tier schools.  When school class and NHS were entered into an ordinal logistic regression model NHS membership but not graduating year predicted the type of college that students were admitted to.  A higher percentage of NHS membership in a class predicts a higher % in an upper tier college.  In the last two years McCort had a student admitted to the University of Pennsylvania and Cornell respectively.

McCort has admitted students from China.  I counted 10 in the 2017 graduating class based on their name.  Five of these were NHS members which is close to the overall class rate of 46%.  

Things like the SAT are meant to quantify a students raw ability regardless of where they went to school.  College admissions consider a variety of factors in their decision making process. If they believed that NHS membership was not warranted, the upper tier schools would not admit that student.


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