Sunday, June 23, 2019

Freshman House Democrats, their Race/Ethnicity, Campaign Donors, and Single Payer


Last week I posted on how Freshman House Democrats differed in campaign contributions from the healthcare industry with respect to their Race/Ethnic background and their support for single payer healthcare and or Medicare for All.  Nonwhite freshman who supported Medicare for All received considerably less in contributions received considerably less that white ones who did.  The data was compiled by Danielle Keeton-Olson for Tarbell magazine.  This is a followup to that post to see if there is a difference in this pattern by the type of donor using the 2 way factorial Analysis of Variance: health professionals, Health Services/HMOs, Hospitals/Nursing Homes, and Pharma/Health Products.



Health Professionals
Mean or average $ contribution
Support single payer
Race/Ethnicity
White
Nonwhite
Total sp
Yes
106,732
44,593
72,838
Undecided
59,023
77,684
62,755
No
77,060
82,313
78,286
Total eth
80,778
60,318
73,848

The table above shows the average contribution of healthcare professionals.  The data shows a similar pattern to what was found for total contributions with a large difference of more than $60,000 in the average contribution between white and nonwhite freshman who supported Medicare for All.  Nonwhite freshman who were undecided or opposed it received slightly more in contributions from this group.  The interaction was statistically significant (p=0.034).


HMO
Mean or average $ contribution
Support single payer
Race/Ethnicity
White
Nonwhite
Total sp
Yes
13,281
      4,225
  12,678
Undecided
  4,313
      6,205
    9,030
No
 8,511
      7,194
      9,958
Total eth
 8,855
      5,404
      7,686


There was no significant interaction between support for single payer and the ethnicity of the freshman even though there was a large discrepancy in contributions to those who support it.  There was a significant overall effect of ethnicity with white freshman receiving more donations than nonwhite (p=0.036).

Hospitals/Nursing Homes
Mean or average $ contribution
Support single payer
Race/Ethnicity
White
Nonwhite
Total sp
Yes
21,772
      6,476
  14,267
Undecided
10,479
      5,308
     9,445
No
15,180
    11,336
   13,474
Total eth
15,871
      7,985
   13,200


There was a larger effect of ethnicity for contributions from hospitals and nursing homes with white freshman receiving almost double the contribution than nonwhite freshman (p=0.023).  The largest difference in contributions was still between white ($21,772) and nonwhite ($6,476) freshman who support single payer.

Pharma/Health Products
Mean or average $ contribution
Support single payer
Race/Ethnicity
White
Nonwhite
Total sp
Yes
16,221
     4,747
  12,678
Undecided
 9,503
      7,140
    9,030
No
12,724
    12,529
    9,958
Total eth
 12,948
      7,569
  11,126


There were no significant effect for the Pharma/Health Products industry (thou the effect of ethnicity was borderline significant, p=0.086).  Nonwhite freshman who did not support single payer did receive more donations from the HMOs, Hospitals, and pharma than nonwhite freshman who do or who are undecided.  This effect is greater for Hospitals and Pharma.  




For each donor type, white freshman who support Medicare for All received the most donations.  Is this done in hopes of changing their minds on their support?  I don't know.  I do know that some health professionals do support Medicare for All or single payer.  

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez in the above photo received the most donations from health professionals and the fewest from HMOs.  As one of the most outspoken advocates of Medicare for All in Congress, freshman or not, she received donations that are well below the averages for her group.  I grouped her among the nonwhite group as she is Latin American.  The money she received in each category was much less than the averages for her group.  However she was not the lowest recipient among the freshman Dems, she was 59th out of 62 freshman.  



That honor goes to Ed Case who is white, from Hawaii, and opposed medicare for all.  There is some noise in the data with some outliers.  He received a total of $3,750.  Abigail Spanberger was the highest recipient of healthcare campaign dollars at $231,511 with the numbers from each donor type displayed below.  She also opposes Medicare for All.


  

**Related Posts**

POLL: Dislike of healthcare law crosses party lines, 1 in 4 Dems want repeal - TheHill.com (But Doesn't Ask Why)


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